metapixel
  • Once you are under contract, all parties will begin working through the due diligence period and contingencies on the contract. 

    During this time, the buyer will most likely order an inspection on the home to ensure there are no major issues. These inspections can include but are not limited to: a general inspection, radon inspection, sewer scope, mold inspection, roof inspection, structural engineer, etc. A general inspection typically takes a few hours, so plan on being away during this time. 

    Many times, after the inspection, issues will arise that result in another round of negotiations. The buyer may request that you do some repair work or ask for a credit in lieu of repair work. Each inspection and buyer is different, but your agent will be there with sound advice, creative suggestions, and negotiation skills to help you through.

    The lender will also most likely order an appraise to ensure the value. The Lender does not want to be lending more money than the home is worth, so an appraisal is ordered to determine the market value of the home by an independent third-party. 

    During this time, the title company will perform a title search. A Title Company will search all records of the home to verify that the title is indeed transferrable and all liens and loans on the home are paid off during closing ensuring the buyer has no future issues. If you have a loan on your home, the title company will also ask for you to provide them with some information so they can order the payoff letter for your loan, which will be paid at closing.  

    Once all these have been completed and the buyer’s loan has been approved through underwriting, it will be time for you to head to the closing table! 

    Prior to closing, make sure that you have all your moving plans in place. When the buyer takes possession of the home, you should be completely moved out and the home left in a cleanly condition. Call your utilities companies and make sure they are aware of the move and transfer everything out of your name effective on the day of possession. 

    Once the loan is fully approved and the transaction fully funded, you have sold your home. The title company will record the real estate documents with the tax county for you, and the buyers will be able to move in as agreed upon in the contract. Congratulations!!! 

  • Of course, as a seller, you want to get the most money out of your home when you sell it as possible. But there is a lot more to offers that just the dollar amount. 

    It is important to review ALL aspects of an offer before signing it, regardless of whether you have just one on the table or ten. 

    So let’s talk about some other key components you should be reviewing in your offers.

    • ✔️ Reputable Lender. A offer well over asking may be amazing, but if the lender can get that loan to the closing table, then it is all for naught. Make sure the lender has a good reputation and can get the deal done within the specified time.
    • ✔️ Closing Date. Does this date fit your needs? Is it too lengthy? Not far enough out? 
    • ✔️ Reasonable Dates. Beyond just the closing date, you want to make sure the other dates are are reasonably short. Why, you may ask? If the buyer asks for an exceptional long inspection period and then decides at the final hour that the home inspection does not meet their expectations then you have wasted an awfully long amount of time off the market. You want to get it back on the market quickly if there is an issue.
    • ✔️ Contingencies. Does the buyer have to sell a home prior to purchasing yours? Any contingency like this puts an extra layer of risk in the deal. It happens quite often, but be aware.
    • ✔️ Concessions. Sometimes the buyer will ask for the seller to pay concessions at closing towards their closing costs. This will affect your bottom line.
  • Once photos of your home is completed, marketing is prepared, and the sign is in the front yard, you are ready to put your home on the market! In addition to the MLS, you can ask your agent to make your listing available on syndication sites like Realtor.com and Zillow. 

    Showings will soon begin on your home. It is helpful to make yourself as flexible as possible for showings to accommodate potential buyers. Be sure to keep your home show ready as much as possible during this time period. It might even be wise to make plans to be away the first weekend if you anticipate it will be really busy. 

    You prepped your home for to get the best photos, and during showings you want to do your best to keep it that way. You want your buyers to feel at home and fall in love. So before you leave the house for a showing, take a few minutes to run through this checklist:

    Open All Windows & Turn On All the Lights. Walking into a dark, dimly lit home just doesn’t spark the same amount joy as walking into a light, bright one does.

    Put Away All Clutter. This includes the countertops, toys, and pet items. The cleaner the canvas the better buyers can imagine themselves there.

    Give It a Quick Clean. Wipe down the countertops and vacuum the floors the morning of, if possible.

    Check for Any Odors. Make sure the trash is taken out and the dirty laundry is put up. Avoid simply covering up the odor with air fresheners as some people can be sensitive to these.

    Set a Comfortable Temperature. A house that is too hot or too cold can create a bad showing experience for the buyer making them think negatively about your home.

    Create an Ambiance. Whether it is lighting the fireplace or turning on some music, make your home as welcoming as possible.

  • Photos will be the VERY FIRST impression that buyers will get of your home. Most everyone these days begins their home search online, browsing through photos. Between all the houses, they can start to blend together, so it stands to reason that you want the best photos possible that will stop them in their tracks.

    This starts with a great photographer, so it is key to make sure that your agent hires a professional to take the listing photos rather than using a mobile phone or personal camera.

    But your part is just as crucial, and that is preparing your home for photos. You don’t need to hire an interior design or get a stager involved (if you don’t want to), but you will want to be intentional about how you prep your home before photos.

    Use this checklist to help make your home HGTV photo-worthy!

    The Kitchen

    • Clear the countertops of all non-decorative items.
    • Remove all magnets, photos, and artwork from your refrigerator. 
    • Wipe down the sink, particularly stainless steel ones.

    The Bathrooms

    • Clear the countertops of all non-decorative items.
    • Remove all shampoos and soaps from the shower area.
    • Ensure all toilet seats are down and toilet paper is filled.

    The Living Areas

    • Remove any seasonal, religious, or political decor.
    • Remove all personal items and minimize family photos.
    • Ensure all toys are put away.

    The Yard

    • Make sure the grass is freshly cut and the landscaping is trimmed.
    • Put away flags, hoses, pool equipment, etc.
    • Ensure all pet waste is removed from the yard.

    Other

    • Turn on all lights, including lamps, and open all curtains.
    • Put away all pet items including food and water bowls.
    • Ensure no vehicle are parked in front of the house.
  • When it comes time to sell your home, the pricing and preparation are just as important, if not more important, than the marketing itself. When it comes to pricing your home, your agent should do a thorough analysis of the comparables in your neighborhood to determine market value. It is important to price your home correctly right off the bat to avoid it sitting on the market. Homes priced too high tend to sit and eventually sell for a lower purchase price. 

    When preparing your analysis, an agent will look at similar homes in your area that have recently sold, are currently listed, or were withdrawn from the market without selling to determine what your home may sell for in today’s market.

    Your agent will likely use properties that have similar:

    • Size
    • Bedroom Count
    • Bathroom Count
    • Location
    • Style
    • Etc

    They will consider what makes your home unique from other properties including features, upgrades, location, etc as well as qualities that may make it less desirable when compared to other homes.

    All this information is used to properly price your home when listed. Pricing is key when listing, and we want to insure it is done well off the bat. Pricing your home too high could lead to extended time on the market and ultimately lower offers since buyers will begin to question if something is wrong with it.

    This is a crucial step as a well-priced home will attract more buyers and sell quicker.